Probate … The divisions are the Chancery Division, presided over by the chancellor of the…, Court, a person or body of persons having judicial authority to hear and resolve disputes in civil, criminal, ecclesiastical, or military cases. County courts of pleas and quarter sessions evolved from precinct courts in 1738. I live in Washington State is this document on line? Staffed by justices of the peace and appointed by the governor , the court heard cases in which the amount of litigation was between 40 shillings and 20 pounds, as well as a variety of minor civil and criminal actions.

Used by permission of the publisher. They were abolished in England and …

The court also served as the governing body of the county, responsible for the appointment and qualification of local officials, levying of local taxes, expenditure of public funds, granting of licenses (tavern keepers, ferry operators, and peddlers), registration of stock marks, paternity inquisitions, and emancipation and manumission of slaves. Following the Civil War, the new state constitution replaced the justices of the peace with a county commissioner form of government in 1868. Corrections? And here is a link to their services page where you will find information about ordering copies: https://archives.ncdcr.gov/researchers/services. Thank you for your comment. History of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions Goodspeeds Histories of Sumner, Smith, Macon, Trousdale, Counties of Tennessee, published 1887. Announcing our NEW encyclopedia for Kids! Here is the link to their website: https://archives.ncdcr.gov/.
The Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions served as the civil, administrative, and judicial arms of North Carolina county government beginning in the Proprietary period (1663-1729). Thank you for visiting NCpedia and especially for taking the time to post your question. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher. These and all subsequent counties operated quarter sessions courts until a constitutional change in 1968 consolidated them with the courts of common pleas. NCpedia will not publish personal contact information in comments, questions, or responses.
I'm presuming this was an executive administrative post. Courts of pleas and quarter sessions were abolished by the Constitution of 1868. If you would like a reply by email, note that some email servers, such as public school accounts, are blocked from accepting messages from outside email servers or domains. County courts of pleas and quarter sessions evolved from precinct courts in 1738. PLEASE NOTE: NCpedia provides the comments feature as a way for viewers to engage with the resources. Label vector designed by Ibrandify - Freepik.com, "While North Carolina women have been voting at slightly higher rates in recent years, their representation in elec…, The NC Council For Women and Youth Involvement (, https://archives.ncdcr.gov/Public/Collections/Government-Records. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica. Court minutes and other related records may also be available on third party websites. Erin Bradford, Government and Heritage Library. William S. Powell, North Carolina through Four Centuries (1989). Staffed by justices of the peace and appointed by the governor, the court heard cases in which the amount of litigation was between 40 shillings and 20 pounds, as well as a variety of minor civil and criminal actions.

The State Archives provides links to many of these collections in its Digital Collection. Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Please let me know if you have additional questions or need further assistance. For personal use and not for further distribution. Original county court records for North Carolina are kept by the State Archives. I hope this information helps. Kelly Agan, State Library of NC.

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. The courts of quarter sessions or quarter sessions were local courts traditionally held at four set times each year in the Kingdom of England from 1388 until the end of the kingdom, then in 18th-century Great Britain, in the later United Kingdom, and in other dominions of the British Empire.